Council of Women of Winnipeg Inc.

NCWC RESOLUTIONS AND UPDATE 2017

The Council of Women of Winnipeg will be holding their resolutions meeting on Thursday March 16, 2017 at 7pm all are welcome to attend.

 

LIST OF NCWC RESOLUTIONS 2017

 

1. The Provision of Humane Holding Conditions for Migrant Detainees

 

2. Environmental Harm from Cigarette Filters

 

3. Safety of Food Additive Azodicarbonamide

 

4. Increasing Security by Relocating Railways to Outlying Areas

 

5. Addressing Aboriginal Suicide 

 

 

 1. THE PROVISION OF HUMANE HOLDING CONDITIONS FOR MIGRANT DETAINEES

Proposed by Niagara District Council of Women

Whereas #1    the  Government of Canada has abrogated the purposes of the Canada Immigration Act and International human rights law by holding migrant detainees, including families and children, in jails and detention centres where sometimes children are separated from their parents; and

Whereas #2    many of the detainees have no criminal record and are held mainly for                                           administrative purposes; and

Whereas #3    conditions in jails and detention facilities are often inhumane and can lead to                                  irreparable psychological harm to children and worsen the mental health of                                    others; therefore be it   

Resolved  #1  that National Council of Women of Canada adopt as policy that immigration                                  detainees awaiting either approval to enter Canada or before deportation, be                                  held in humane conditions, and that children not be separated from families; and                                   be it further

Resolved #2   that the National Council of Women of Canada urge the Government of Canada                           uphold the purposes of the Canada Immigration Act to respect human rights by:

a)    immediately halting the practice of holding migrant detainees, awaiting government  approval to enter Canada legally, in jails

b)    immediately planning and executing  the provision of  suitable migrant detainee and family centres in all major Canadian cities, and

c)    ensuring that humane conditions in these facilities  be maintained and monitored.

BACKGROUND:

1.       The Refugee and Immigration Act - Immigration and Refugee Protection Act

     laws.justice.gc.ca/eng/acts/i-2.5/

   

The objectives of this Act with respect to refugees are:

o    (a) to recognize that the refugee program is in the first instance about saving lives and offering protection to the displaced and persecuted;

o    (b) to fulfil Canada’s international legal obligations with respect to refugees and affirm Canada’s commitment to international efforts to provide assistance to those in need of resettlement;

o    (c) to establish fair and efficient procedures that will maintain the integrity of the Canadian refugee protection system, while upholding Canada’s respect for the human rights and fundamental freedoms of all human beings;

 

2.    International Human Rights program, University of Toronto Declaration.

http://www.law.utoronto.ca/news/canada-should-implement-alternatives-immigration-detention-children-family-separation-says-ihrp    

“Canada should implement alternatives to immigration detention and children-family separation”.                     

3.    Canadian Red Cross ReportThe human and financial cost of detention of asylum seekers in Canada. Delphine Nakache                                                                                                                                                   http://www.unhcr.ca/wp-content/uploads/2014/10/RPT-2011-12-etention_assylum_seekers-e.pdf

The Canadian Red Cross and several  legal and medical advocacy groups have urged the government to halt the  practice immediately, however  the Minister of  Public Safety has promised just to “mainly”   phase out the use of provincial jails for detaining immigration detainees  and to develop needed reforms.  

 

2. ENVIRONMENTAL HARM FROM CIGARETTE FILTERS

Proposed by Niagara District Council of Women

 

Whereas #1    cigarette plastic filters are a huge wide-spread pollutant, mostly discarded into                               the environment, washed into lakes, and eaten by birds, animals and fish; and

 

Whereas #2    cigarette filters, 95% of them being made of non-biodegradable cellulose                                       acetate particles, provide little to no benefit to smokers, and are designed to                                   accumulate toxins; therefore be it

 

Resolved #1   that the National Council of Women of Canada as policy that cigarette                                           manufacturers be required to make cigarette filters fully bio-degradable                                          within the next three years or to eliminate them; and be it further

 

Resolved #2 that the National Council of Women of Canada urge the Government of                                          Canada to enact legislation that requires manufacturers to make cigarette                          filters, fully bio-degradable within the next three years or else be required to                              remove them from cigarettes altogether.

 

Background:

1.    American Chemical Society. Recycling ‘tiny trash’-cigarette butts.” Science Daily. Science Daily,14 May 2010

www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/05/100512112424.htm.

 

“Jun Zhao and colleagues cite one estimate that 4.5 trillion cigarette butts find their way into the environment each year. Studies show that cigarettes are more than an eyesore. They contain toxins that can kill fish and harm the environment in other ways. ”

 

2.    Ban cigarette filters to save environment, suggest researchers. Science Daily, 2014.

www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/05/140506130536.htm

 

“Filters don’t make cigarettes safer: Many smokers believe filters provide some protection-that they’re safer-but the National Cancer Institute publications among others show there have been no benefits to public health from filters.”

 

3.    Cancer information request (Date06/06/2016 User 556)

Hamiltoncis@cancer.ca (Hamilton Cancer Centre)

 

 “Neither CCS (Canadian Cancer Society) nor Health Canada recommends filtered cigarettes for smokers unable to quit: there has not been a demonstrated health benefit. Virtually all cigarettes sold in Canada have filters…”

 

 3. SAFETY OF FOOD ADDITIVE AZODICARBONAMIDE

Proposed by Niagara District Council of Women

Whereas #1    Azodicarbonamide is a food additive found in bread flour and is also found                                     in the undercoating of jarred food lids, including baby food; and

Whereas #2    Azodicarbonamide has been found to produce asthma in those                                                       manufacturing it or using it; and

Whereas #3    Europe has banned the additive but Health Canada considers it safe; and

Whereas #4    Health Canada has not established a safe daily intake; therefore be it

Resolved #1   that the National Council of Women of Canada (NCWC) adopt as policy                                        that azodicarbonamide not be used in flour and jar lids unless scientific                                           evidence establishes that there is a safe daily intake; and be it further

Resolved #2   that NCWC urge the Government of Canada to disallow azodicarbonamide to be                          used in flour and jar lids unless scientific evidence establishes that there is a safe              daily intake.

 

Background

1. Science Dictionary: What is AZODICARBONAMIDE? definition of AZODICARBONAMIDE (Science Dictionary) 

Azodicarbonamide is a yellow to orange red crystalline powder, used as a food additive or as an additive in the production of foamed plastics. 

2. Hansard, Question #503 September 15, 2014

https://openparliament.ca/debates/2014/9/15/?page=14

Rona Ambrose, Minister of Health, in 2014 stated “Health Canada completed a thorough safety assessment of the use of azodicarbonamide in 2006....[The assessment] ...did take into consideration exposure to one of its main breakdown products, semicarbazide...  The results of Health Canada’s studies on semicarbazide demonstrated that manufacturers were using azodicarbonamide according to Canada’s food additive provisions and that levels of semicarbazide formed did not represent a health risk to consumers...No acceptable daily intake has been established for azodicarbonamide or its chemical by-products...Following the 2006 evaluation, it was concluded that there was a very large margin of safety between doses associated with adverse effects in experimental animals and the maximum dietary exposure for Canadians...Currently, azodicarbonamide can be used as a food additive in bread, flour or whole wheat flour at a maximum level of 45 parts per million.

3. Is Azodicarbonamide in bread at Subway, McDonalds and other foods safe? Environmental Health and Safety Online. 

http://www.ehso.com/Azodicarbonamide_In_Bread.htm

“No adequate studies of carcinogenicity and reproductive toxicity, in animals or in humans, could be identified.”

4. Semicarbazide Formation in Azodicarbonamide-Treated Flour: A Model Study.  Adam Becalski, Benjamin P-Y Lau, David Lewis and Stephen W. Seaman, Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, 2004, 52(18) pp 5730-5734.  Abstract.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15373416

“Semicarbazide was previously found in foods that were in contact with rubber gaskets foamed at high temperatures with a blowing agent azodicarbonamide.  Because azodicarbonamide is an approved flour additive in certain countries, we set out to ascertain if semicarbazide is formed during the baking process from flours containing that additive....Semicarbazide was formed during the dry heating of commercial azodicarbonamide-containing flours at temperatures of 150-200 degrees C reaching levels of 0.2 mg/km.  Similar levels of semicarbazide were found in the crusts of breads made from azodicarbonamide-treated flour.”

5. List of substances that can cause occupational asthma.  Health and Safety Executive, United Kingdom, August 2015.

http://www.hse.gov.uk/asthma/substances.htm

“Azodicarbonamide – used in the expansion of polymers in the rubber and plastics industries.”

6. Research progress on the toxicity of semicarbazide by S. Gao and S.-G. Ru.  ResearchGate (Professional network for scientists and researchers), June 2013.

https://www.researchgate.net/publication/286139646_Research_progress_on_the_toxicity_of_semicarbazide

 

“Recent researches proved that SEM [semicarbazide] not only causes histological and morphological alternation in target organs, but also disturbs the nervous and endocrine systems.”

 

 

 4. INCREASING SECURITY BY RELOCATING RAILWAYS TO OUTLYING AREAS

Proposed by Gisele Saurette-Roch

 

 

Whereas #1    existing and inadequate NCWC policy on Public Safety dates to 1991 “Review                              recent disasters to discover ways and means of improving official and public                                 responses to emergencies”; and

 

Whereas #2    there has been an exponential increase in Canada in the number of railway cars                           transporting toxic substances; and

 

Whereas #3    despite long-standing recommendations by the Government of Canada, railroad                           companies have neglected to maintain and up-grade the rail lines and the railway              cars & tankers; and

 

Whereas #4    in 2013, Lac Mégantique was the site of a major railroad accident which resulted                           in a tragic explosion of several oil cars in the middle of the town costing 47 lives                            as well as the economic cost to rebuild the whole downtown section; therefore be                  it

Resolved #1   that the National Council of Women of Canada (NCWC) adopt as policy the                                  relocation of railways from urban to outlying areas; and be it further

 

Resolved #2   that NCWC urge the Government of Canada to relocate railways from urban to                            outlying areas; and be it further

 

Resolved #3   that NCWC urge the Government of Canada evaluate the conditions and risks                              related to the rail industry, identify safety concerns and ensure that Transport                                Canada enforces the codes and regulations for rail companies; and be it further

 

Resolved #4   that Local and Provincial Councils of Women urge their respective levels of                                   government to cooperate with stakeholders in the relocation of the                                      railways located in their respective jurisdictions to maximize the security of their                              citizens and communities.

 

Background

 

1. “Transporting Crude Oil by Rail in Canada” March 2014 CAPP- Canadian Association                      of Petroleum Producers

      There has been an increase in the number of railway cars transporting toxic substances, including oil, natural gas, and tar sands bitumen form 4000 tank cars in 2000 to 16,000        in 2014, while in USA the increase from 2008 to 2013 is from 9,500 to 407,761 at an        average rate of 600 barrels per tank car, some of which travel through Canada.

www.capp.ca/~/media/capp/customer-portal/documents/242427.pdf

 

2. Exclusive: CN Rail derailment numbers soared before recent crashes.  Reuters, March    23, 2015.

     Trains operated by CN in Canada derailed along main lines 57 times in 2014, up 73                            percent from 33 in 2013 and well above a 2009-2013 average of 39 accidents per year. 

  At least 27 of the domestic derailments were caused by track problems, up from a previous annual average of 14.

       http://www.reuters.com/article/us-canada-derailments-exclusive-idUSKBN0MJ0AZ20150323

 

       3. Protective Direction 38.  Transport Canada, November 2016.

            The Minister of Transport, in accordance with the Transportation of Dangerous Goods     Act, 1992, issued Protective Direction (PD) 38 on July 13, 2016.

            This Protective Direction further accelerates the phase-out of both jacketed and    unjacketed legacy DOT-111 tank cars from being used for crude oil service in Canada           as of November 1, 2016. All other provisions of the Regulations Amending the Transportation of Dangerous Goods Regulations (TC-117 tank cars) published in        Canada Gazette Part II in May 2015 remain in effect.

https://www.tc.gc.ca/eng/tdg/safety-menu-1272.html

 

4. Railway Investigation Report R13D0054. Transportation Safety Board of Canada,             August 2014.

  “At 2340, a call was made to a 911 operator to report a fire on a train at Nantes...  When the track foreman arrived on site, the firefighters indicated that the emergency fuel cut-off switch had been used to shut down the lead locomotive. This shutdown put out the fire by removing the fuel source. Firefighters also moved the electrical breakers inside the locomotive cab to the off position to eliminate a potential ignition source. These actions were in keeping with railway instructions.”

“With no locomotive running, the air in the train’s brake system slowly began to be depleted, resulting in a reduction in the retarding force holding the train. At about 0100 (July 06), the train started to roll downhill toward Lac-Mégantic, 7.2 miles away. At about 0115, the train derailed near the centre of town, releasing about 6 million litres of petroleum crude oil, which resulted in a large fire and multiple explosions.”

“As a result of the derailment and the ensuing fires and explosions, 47 people died, and about 2000 people were evacuated. Forty buildings and 53 vehicles were destroyed.”

http://www.tsb.gc.ca/eng/rapports-reports/rail/2013/r13d0054/r13d0054.asp

 

 

  

5. ADDRESSING ABORIGINAL SUICIDE

Proposed by the Provincial Council of Women of Saskatchewan

 

Whereas #1    suicide and self-inflicted injuries are among the leading causes of death among First Nations, Métis and Inuit people; and

Whereas #2    suicide rates among indigenous people, especially among youth, are six to 11        times the Canadian average and one of the highest suicide rates in the world;            and

Whereas #3    suicide is considered to be a symptom of crowded housing, inter-generational        trauma, family violence, a family history of suicide, witnessing or experiencing        physical or sexual abuse, depression, alcohol and drug dependency, mental    health disorders,  hopelessness, isolation, low self-            esteem, parental loss or          homelessness, and lack of  access to means for treatment; and

Whereas #4    community suicide prevention is best undertaken by community members,           friends and family who understand the social context of the community; and

Whereas #5    it will require co-ordination among education, justice, employment and social        welfare sectors to ensure aboriginal communities have a community-based            approach that is rooted in indigenous culture and values to protect against        suicide; therefore be it

Resolved #1   that the National Council of Women of Canada (NCWC) adopt as policy that                                 aboriginal suicide be addressed by the National, Provincial and Aboriginal                          Governments working together; and be it further

Resolved #2   that the NCWC urge the National, Provincial and Aboriginal Governments, with                             overlapping jurisdictions, to work together to:

a)    determine the specific causes of suicide within individual aboriginal communities;

b)    provide aboriginal communities with the dedicated resources necessary to deal with these issues;

c)    ensure aboriginal communities have the tools to become culturally healthy.

 

Background

Numerous studies indicate suicide and self-inflicted injuries are among the leading causes of death among First Nations, Métis, and Inuit people in Canada. Suicide rates among Inuit are shockingly high at six to 11 times the Canadian average. In Nunavut in particular, 27% of all deaths since 1999 have been suicides. This is one of the highest suicide rates in the world, and it continues to rise, especially among youth.

The recent spate of aboriginal youth suicides and attempts at suicide in Canada includes, but is not exclusive to:

·         The 4 teens from the Pimicikamak Cree Nation in Manitoba who committed suicide in March, 2016;

·         The 28 people from Attiwapiskat who attempted suicide; the majority of whom were under the age of 18, in March, 2016;

·         The 11 teens from Attiwapiskat who killed themselves in April, 2016, bringing the total of attempted and/or completed suicides in that same area to 100 during the period from August, 2015, to April, 2016; and

·         The 6 young girls from the Saskatchewan reserves of Stanley Mission, Deschambault Lake, and La Ronge who committed suicide in October, 2016.  One girl was only 10 years old; the oldest was 14.

·         There have been many calls for action to address the ‘social illnesses’ that are so very evident when the possible reasons for the individual cases are closely examined.  Suicide is a symptom, not a disease. Among the factors mentioned as driving suicide are:

o   crowded housing;

o   intergenerational trauma;

o   family violence

o   family history of suicide;

o   witnessing or experiencing physical or sexual abuse;

o   incest;

o   depression;

o   substance abuse;

o   mental health disorders;

o   intoxication;

o   access to means;

o   hopelessness; and

o   isolation.

 

Mr. Bellegarde, National Chief of the Assembly of First Nations, is on record stating that there must be a national strategy to combat indigenous suicide. It must include all levels of government with overlapping jurisdictions working together to develop a plan of action to prevent future tragedies of this kind – especially among youth.  Canada is the only developed country without such an initiative.  

Successful strategies must be formulated within the context of the aboriginal indigenous culture and values in specific communities so they can arrive at their own appropriate solutions to this pandemic.  It is absolutely imperative they be given the proper resources to do so in a timely fashion.

We have often heard it takes a whole community to raise a child, and, in this case, the community is the whole of our country, Canada.

 

References

1.    “Aboriginal People” issue of Visions Journal, 2008, 5 (1), pp 6-7.

2.    Government of Canada (2006).  Aboriginal mental health and well-being.  In the human face of mental health and mental illness in Canada (Chapter 12).  Ottawa: Minister of Public Works and Government Services Canada.  www.phac-aspc.gc.ca/publicat/human-humain06/index-eng.php

3.    Chandler, M. and Lalonde, C. (2008); Environics Institute. (2010). Urban Aboriginal Peoples Study: Main report. Toronto, ON: Environics Institute.

4.    Health Canada. (2010). Acting On What We Know: Preventing Youth Suicide in First Nations. Retrieved from http://www.hc-sc.gc.ca/fniah-spnia/pubs/promotion/_suicide/prev_youth-jeunes/ index-eng.php#tph;

5.    Elias, B., et al. (2012).Trauma and Suicide Behaviour Histories Among a Canadian Indigenous Population: An Empirical Exploration of the Potential Role of Canada’s Residential School System. Social Science & Medicine. 74(10), 1560-1569.

6.    Kirmayer, L., et al. (2007).Suicide among Aboriginal people in Canada .Ottawa, Ontario: Aboriginal Healing Foundation.)

7.    For First Nations Facing Suicide Crisis, The Solution is Rooted in the Community Duncan McCue, CBC News Posted: Apr 18, 2016 5:00 AM ET Last Updated: Apr 19, 2016 9:17 AM ET

8.    Suicides of Northern Saskatchewan Indigenous Girls on Minds of Leaders By Staff The Canadian Press November 8, 2016 6:56 am

9.    Ideas to address aboriginal suicide in Northern Saskatchewan, Richard Thatcher  Regina Leader Post Published on October 31, 2016

10. Isolation-a Barrier to Exposing Sexual Abuse, Incest on Reserve: Bellegarde Kristy Kirkup, The Canadian Press  11.13.2016 (http://www.thestarphoenix.com/health/isolation+barrier+exposing+sexual+abuse+incest+reserve+bellegarde/12382728/story.html

11.  The Globe and Mail – Source: Health Canada, July 08, 2016

12. National Post September 15, 2016 3:41 PM EST

 

  

 

 

 

Media Release

 

 

MAY 2015

 For Immediate Release:

 May 27th, 2015

 WHAT: National Council of Women of Canada (NCWC) AGM attended by Council of Women of Winnipeg (CWW) and Provincial Council of Women of Manitoba (PCWM)

WHERE: Montreal, QC

WHEN: May 21--24th, 2015

WHO: CWW delegates – Kelly-Ann Stevenson, Randi Gage, and Gisele Saurette-Roch, PCWM delegates – Alberta Johnson, Alexandra Shkandrij, and Muriel Smith

For more information please contact:

Kelly-Ann Stevenson, Media Contact

President - Council of Women of Winnipeg

Vice President - National Council of Women of Canada

204-825 Sherbrook Ave Wpg MB R3A 1M5

(204) 997-9632

-------

 For Immediate Release:

Wednesday, May 27th, 2015

National Council of Women of Canada AGM

 Winnipeg, MB- Council of Women of Winnipeg (CWW) along with Provincial Council of Women of Manitoba (PCWM) recently returned from the National Council of Women of Canada (NCWC) AGM held in Montreal, Quebec May 21 – 24, 2015.  This AGM provides a forum for members to bring resolutions forward to the national stage and participate in a national discussion about issues facing Canadian women. 

The strength of the National Council of Women of Canada’s work comes from a broadly based network of organizations affiliated with its local and provincial councils, and affiliates of the NCWC.  It is their representatives who research and debate proposals for change and develop the resolutions, which the NCWC presents to government. When these resolutions are approved at the national level, they represent the consensus of many thousands of women.

There was great Manitoba representation at the AGM from the Manitoba delegation – CWW delegates – Kelly-Ann Stevenson, Randi Gage, and Gisele Saurette- Roch, PCWM delegates – Alberta Johnson, Alexandra Shkandrij, and Muriel Smith.

A number of policies originating from the Council of Women of Winnipeg were adopted at NCWC AGM:

1.       MAXIMIZE REMOVAL OF CHEMICALS & PHARMACEUTICALS FROM WASTEWATER BEFORE RELEASING WASTEWATER INTO THE ENVIRONMENT

2.       THE REGULATION OF ELECTRONIC CIGARETTES

3.       UPDATE Policy -  MISSING AND MURDERED ABORIGINAL WOMEN

Other policies that were approved:

1.      MEAT AND CLIMATE CHANGE by St. Catharines & District Council of Women

2.      MEDICALLY ASSISTED DEATH  by St. Catharines & District Council of Women

3.      REGULATION OF TOXINS AND BANNING OF ANTIBACTERIALS IN PERSONAL CARE PRODUCTS   by St. Catharines & District Council of Women

4.      REDUCTION IN SUGAR CONTENT IN PROCESSED FOOD, FRUIT DRINKS AND SODA POP Toronto and Area Council of Women

5.      UPDATE Policy ASBESTOS EXPOSURE A HEALTH HAZARD by Gracia Janes, VP Environment

 

For further information you may contact:

Kelly-Ann Stevenson

President - Council of Women of Winnipeg

Vice President - National Council of Women of Canada

204-825 Sherbrook Ave Wpg MB R3A 1M5

(204)-997-9632

 

 BACKGROUND

 

The National Council of Women of Canada (NCWC) was founded on October 27, 1893, by Lady Aberdeen, Ishbel Maria Hamilton-Gordon, Marchioness of Aberdeen and Temair, GBE, wife of the Governor-General of Canada. Throughout its history, the Council has been concerned with the welfare and improvement of the conditions of life for women, the family, and the community since its founding. The Council is a vibrant, pro-active, credible organization of women reflecting the diversity of society, encouraging informed political decision-making and public attitudes for the well-being of society, through research, education, consultation and cooperation. NCWC was designated by the Government of Canada as being of historical significance for its role in Canadian women’s history.  Today, NCWC is comprised of Local Councils of Women and Study Groups in 12 Canadian cities, Provincial Councils of Women in 6 Canadian provinces, Study Groups in one Canadian province and 10 affiliated National Organizations. http://www.ncwcanada.com/

 

 

 Council of Winnipeg Women

The Council is a nonpartisan, non-sectarian network of organizations and individuals of diverse interests networking to pursue work of common interest where the stability of the family and the welfare of the community are concerned. http://councilofwomen-winnipeg.webs.com

 

 

Provincial Council of Women of Manitoba

PCWM strives to empower women to improve the quality of life for themselves, their families and society. It is a volunteer organization consisting of a federation of organizations and individual members whose purpose is to improve social conditions by influencing political decision-making and public attitudes. This common purpose draws support from people from all political parties, and members from a variety of social, economic, religious and ethnic backgrounds. http://pcwmanitoba.ca/

 

 

 

 

  

 

 

As published in the National Council of Women of Canada Newsletter - March 2015

The Council of Women of Winnipeg Inc. had a very very busy spring and summer. Many historical celebrations were organized by the Council in celebrating our 120 Anniversary. 

On April 8, 2014 was the first celebration of Council of Women of Winnipeg Inc. 120 Anniversary. We hosted a noon hour celebration at Winnipeg City Hall with His Honour Mayor Sam Katz. 

On April 16, 2014 the CWW executive and past presidents were invited to attend Manitoba Legislature to hear MLA Deanne Crothers present a private member’s statement –

Deanne Crothers, MLA St. James
April 16, 2014

Council of Women of Winnipeg–120th Anniversary

This year the Council of Women of Winnipeg celebrates their 120th anniversary. I am pleased to have council president Kelly-Ann Stevenson and other members of the council joining us in the gallery today.

The council was formed when 10 Winnipeg women's groups came together on March 27th, 1894 to organize the Winnipeg council. It was one of the first in Canada. The longevity of this organization is a testament to the importance of their work and the strength of their membership. The council is made up of a network of organizations and individuals who work together to pursue common interests on behalf of families and their communities.

In the 120 years since its establishment the Council of Women of Winnipeg has debated issues and advocated public policy on a diverse range of topics. They have long been a leading proponent for the voice of women in public life and have deeply influenced our city and province. They have supported nurses, low-income housing, access to education, home care, as well as fair salaries and employment equity practices. The Winnipeg council was also a founding member of women's model parliament and their early work led to the formation of the Consumers' Association of Canada.

With 120 years of hard work behind them this is just a snapshot of their incredible accomplishments. Today, they continue to advocate the diverse views of their membership. The Winnipeg council is part of a broader network of women's councils which includes the Provincial Council of Women of Manitoba and the National Council of Women of Canada. Collectively, these organizations empower, educate and improve the quality of life for women across Canada.

Mr. Speaker, I ask all members of the Legislature to join me in thanking the Council of Women of Winnipeg for 120 years of truly incredible advocacy.

Thank you very much.

 

The celebrations continued - on April 23, 2014 The Manitoba Lieutenant Governor His Honour Philip Lee and Her Honour Anita Lee hosted an evening gala the Government House celebrating the 120 Anniversary of CWW.  

The grand finale of our celebration will be on Thursday, May 29, 2014 7-9pm at out AGM with Special Guest Speaker  - The Honourable Sharon Carstairs. 

At the AGM we also welcomed two new Board members to Council Membership – Eva Beaudoin and Member-at-large -  Randi Gage.  We were very pleased with the participation of all our events and this resulted in new, and many renewals of individual and Federate memberships. 

On August 17, the body of Tina Fontaine, a 15 year old Aboriginal girl from Winnipeg was found in the Red River; a tragic death that should have never occurred. This travesty again focuses the need for urgent action to respond to missing and murdered Aboriginal women and girls in Canada. CWW has been actively participating with our Federates  - University Women’s Club – Winnipeg and other local organizations on elected officials to take meaningful action that meets the needs identified by Aboriginal women and girls, including a full public inquiry and a national action plan to address the disproportionate violence Aboriginal women and girls experience.  The violence against aboriginal women and girls must end now.   

This fall has been very busy for CWW as we have been be involved in the Winnipeg municipal elections – October 22, 2014 -  bringing forward the issues that affect the welfare of Winnipeg, women, families and society.  

We have partnered with the Winnipeg Social Planning Council and along with other organizations to host a mayoral candidate forum. The question submitted to the forum from CWW was regarding the CWW resolution that Winnipeg’s by-laws be changed to ensure that addresses on buildings and residences are clearly visible from the public road way.

 

 

 

 

 

                                                                                                           

 Hello where has the year gone? There are many things to share with all of you and here are some highlights of the past year.

 

·        April 20, 2013 Council of Women of Winnipeg held their Annual General Meeting. Guest speaker was Michael Redhead Champagne -he is the founder and organizer of AYO (Aboriginal Youth Opportunities!) He is responsible for networking, public relations and mentorship. He is a well known public speaker, blogger and community activist. At the AGM new board of directors was elected. President Kelly-Ann Stevenson, Past President Arlene Draffin Jones, Treasurer Patricia Fraser, Recording Secretary Susan Hancharyk, Membership Monika Feist, Program Dr. Joan Grace, Resolutions Gisele Saurette-Roch, Communications Eva Marie Lessing, Constitution Lore Mirwaldt, Archives Sandra Kloss.

·        May 29th President Kelly-Ann Stevenson made a presentation to City Council expressing the Council’s objection to the potential selling and leasing our publically owned golf courses. Once these golf courses are sold Winnipeg residents and families will lose accessibility to affordable leisure activities in both seasons; golfing and cross country skiing.

·        CWW now has entered into an offsite agreement with Society of Manitobans with Disabilities (SMD) - the Council’s executive and general meetings will now be held at the SMD building. CWW is very grateful to Provincial Council of Women of Manitoba to allow us to share some office space to their office at the SMD location.

·        CWW is excited to share that at last, we are officially incorporated with the government of Manitoba. Our official name is now Council of Women of Winnipeg INC.

·        On July 13, the 7th Celebrating Women Gala was held at the Viscount Gort. This event acknowledges the work and dedication of federates and individual members of the Winnipeg and Provincial & Local Councils for their efforts to improve the lives of women and their communities. Helen Garrity (Ukrainian Women’s association) Emily Ternette (Disabled Women Association Network of Manitoba) Diana Mager (Manitoba Association of Home Economists) Catherine Dunn (Ikwe Widdjitwin) and Margaret Haworth-Brockman ( Prairie Women Association Health Centre of Excellence).

 ·        Over the summer the CWW executive had six meetings –we have been busy working on revisions to our Constitution, updating our membership lists, and meetings with a graphic designer – as we explore changing our “look” – logos and our web site. Along with planning a celebration of the 120 anniversary of the Council of Women of Winnipeg – details are to follow.

·        In September the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives of Manitoba Fundraising Brunch – honoured longtime supporter of our Local Council -  Muriel Smith. Muriel former politician continues to be active with our Local, Provincial and National Councils of Women. It was great honour to see her receive this well-deserved recognition.

 

·        The CWW entered into a fundraising agreement with the FortWhyte Alive’s Adventure Travel Raffle and we were able to raise over $600 for the Council.

·        The CWW has pledged to be actively involved in the municipal Winnipeg election in the fall 2014 addressing issues that affect women, children, families and our community. We kick started our commitment at our General meeting in January 2014 – by having Ms Judy Wasylycia-Leis as our guest speaker – Women of the Front Lines – From Pakistan to Winnipeg. Ms Wasylycia-Leis Recently involved in parliamentary strengthening projects with National Democratic Institute  in Jordan.  In 2010 she contested the election for Mayor of Winnipeg, placing second. She is a former Member of Parliament representing the riding of Winnipeg North in the House of Commons between 1997 and 2010. Served as a Member of the Legislative Assembly in Manitoba representing the riding of St. John’s between 1986 and 1993. She currently Named Chair of the Board of Directors of the Public Services Foundation of Canada and appointed Commissioner to the Commission on Quality Public Services and Tax Fairness.

·         The CWW has pledged to be actively involved in the municipal Winnipeg election in the fall 2014 addressing issues that affect women, children, families and our community. We kick started our commitment at our General meeting in January 2014 – by having Ms Judy Wasylycia-Leis as our guest speaker – Women of the Front Lines – From Pakistan to Winnipeg. Ms Wasylycia-Leis Recently involved in parliamentary strengthening projects with National Democratic Institute in Jordan She currently Named Chair of the Board of Directors of the Public Services Foundation of Canada and appointed Commissioner to the Commission on Quality Public Services and Tax Fairness.

·         At the February General meeting we had as our Guest Speaker -Molly McCracken Director Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives (CCPA) –Manitoba “Re/Creating the City: Winnipeg Now and in the Future” As the CCPA Manitoba director Ms McCracken is one of Manitoba’s leading sources of progressive policy ideas. She has worked in the inner-city Winnipeg facilitating an outreach program with street-involved women and later as Executive Director of an inner-city neighbourhood renewal corporation.  has been involved as an author, research manager and advisor in a number of areas: Aboriginal education, low income housing, inner-city neighbourhood renewal, the economic benefits of child care and Community Economic Development.

·         On March 20th CWW held their resolution meetings Chaired by Resolutions Committee Chairperson Giselle Saurette-Roch. National Council of Women of Canada (NCWC) resolutions were discussed and voted on. Resolutions were; 1. Access to Mifepristone (RU486): for use in Medical Abortions 2. Employment Insurance Reform Regarding Tips  3. Global Farmland Rush 4. Banning the Use of Neonicotinoid Pesticides to Protect Food 5. One-Third Reduction in Sugar Content in Processed Food, Soft Drinks and Juices.

 

Save the Dates:

Fall 2014;

CWW will be involved in the Winnipeg municipal elections, bringing forward the issues that affect the welfare of Winnipeg, women, families and society. We are in the planning stages of hosting possibly mayor and city councillor candidate forums.

We welcome your participation please contact me if you are interested in working with us.

Kelly-Ann Stevenson

presidentcww@gmail.com

204-997-9632